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COVID VACCINE INFORMATION

Unpaid Carers.  Who qualifies as an unpaid carer, for more information click on the COVID 19 advice and information tab on the right hand side of this page

 
  1.  If you have any questions about the COVID Vaccine, please visit NHS Inform , or call the national helpline 0800 030 8013 which is open from 8am to 8pm, seven days a week.  The Surgery has completed Vaccinating the over 75 years plus group.  See COVID 19 Advice page on this website for further information on missed vaccine appointments or when your group will be vaccinated by the Health Board

  1. Patient contact number for Flow Centre Minor Injuries is 0300 790 6267

 for further information on who should attend the minor injury assessment  please click minor illness tab on this page 

COVID Symptoms -If you think you have COVID like symptoms please follow the advice on nhsinform website For further information on Corona virus please click on COVID19 advice and information link on the right hand side of the page

EU citizens should visit www.gov.scot/stayinscotland for advice re the UK governments Settlement Scheme before 30th June 2021

  NO TESTING is available at the practice in ANY CIRCUMSTANCES and that we must follow Health Protection Scotland adviPlease follow the advice on NHS inform or call 0800 028 2816 DO NOT ATTEND LEITH SURGERY

If the helpline has asked you to call us or for any other enquiry we will triage your call.

 As demand is high please be patient and kind to our staff, thank you

 

Flu Symptoms and Post Vaccine Symptoms

Symptoms of flu

The symptoms of flu usually develop within 1 to 3 days of becoming infected. Most people will feel better within a week.

However, you may have a lingering cough and still feel very tired for a further couple of weeks.

Main symptoms

Flu can give you any of the following symptoms:

  • a sudden fever – a temperature of 38C (100.4F) or above
  • a dry, chesty cough
  • a headache
  • tiredness and weakness
  • chills
  • aching muscles
  • limb or joint pain
  • diarrhoea or abdominal (tummy) pain
  • nausea and vomiting
  • a sore throat
  • a runny or blocked nose
  • sneezing
  • loss of appetite
  • difficulty sleeping

Is it flu or a cold?

It can sometimes be difficult to tell if you have flu or just a cold, as the symptoms can be quite similar. The main differences are:

Flu symptoms:

  • come on quickly
  • usually include fever and aching muscles
  • make you feel too unwell to continue your usual activities

Cold symptoms:

  • come on gradually
  • mainly affect your nose and throat
  • are fairly mild, so you can still get around and are usually well enough to go to work

When to visit your GP

If you are otherwise fit and healthy, there's usually no need to visit your GP if you have flu-like symptoms.

You should just rest at home until you feel better, while keeping warm, drinking plenty of water and taking painkillers if necessary.

Read more about how to treat flu

Consider visiting your GP if:

  • you're 65 years of age or over
  • you're pregnant
  • you have a long-term medical condition – such as diabetes, heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease or a neurological disease
  • you have a weakened immune system – for example, because you're having chemotherapy or have HIV
  • you develop chest pain, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, or start coughing up blood
  • your symptoms are getting worse over time or haven't improved after a week

In these situations, you may need extra treatment to prevent or treat complications of flu.

If someone develops fever post vaccination, this should usually resolve within 48 hours. This is a relatively common, expected reaction, and self-isolation and testing for COVID-19 are not required unless COVID is suspected based on other clinical criteria such as cough and/or anosmia.

If fever persists beyond 48 hours or an individual develops other COVID-19 related symptoms, then they should self-isolate and be recommended to have a test for COVID-19. Testing for COVID-19 may also be considered at any time following clinical assessment, or if there are other epidemiological indications such as being a close contact of a case or part of a cluster.”

 



 
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